Eric W. Barfield Blog

5 Reasons Not to Take A Gig

5 Reasons Not to Take A Gig

At the suggestion of a friend of mine, I put together a list of reasons why you shouldn’t take a gig as a sequel to my blog on this topic a while ago. Here are the 5 things that keep me from taking gigs: 

Video: The One That Got Away Cover

Video: The One That Got Away Cover

I decided to do a cover of "The One That Got Away" by Katy Perry, and was lucky enough to get to film it in an abandoned factory. Enjoy! 

Mainstage Mondays: Creating a Hardware/Software Keyboard Rig

Mainstage Mondays: Creating a Hardware/Software Keyboard Rig

I love Mainstage, but like all software, there’s the chance that it could crash live. I love hardware, but it lacks a lot of the functionality and power that software synths offer. Starting last year, I made a decision that if I could help it, I would never rely completely on just hardware or software exclusively, and I started developing a hybrid rig that had redundancy, reliability, and a ton of sonic power. Here’s how I did it: 

7 Ways to Make Your Music Gear Invisible

We own music equipment to serve a means, not to be an end in itself. Here are 7 ways to make your performances more about your music and less about fiddling with your equipment:

 • Practice pressing buttons. The quicker you are at getting the sound you want, the less you have to worry about twisting knobs during the performance.

• Pre-prep everything.  Don't wait to the last second to put together your equipment – test everything at home, so it's not a distraction at the venue.

• Buy intiutive equipment . If your live rig is difficult to work with, get rid of it. Speed is everything when you're making on the fly tweaks.

 • Buy quality equipment. Settling for cheap may be easier in the short term, but paying a few extra dollars for something that won't constantly need fixing saves time and a lot of headaches.

• Don't switch equipment too often. It's tempting to always buy the latest and greatest, but having equipment on stage that you're comfortable with is often more important than having all the latest bells and whistles.

 • Practice using your equipment at home. Don't just program at home – set up your equipment just like you'll be using it at the venue, and practice with it frequently. 

• Simplify, simplify. The fewer cables, software instruments, and keyboards you have on stage, the less likely you are to have a problem with one of them.

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5 Ways You’re Networking All Wrong

5 Ways You’re Networking All Wrong

Sadly, most of the “networking” most musicians do simply doesn’t work. Here’s 5 mistakes musicians make all the time when networking: