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5 Things I Learned at My First Nashville Recording Session

5 Things I Learned at My First Nashville Recording Session

I didn’t write a blog on Wednesday like I have every week for the last 3 years because I was lucky enough to be playing my first recording session in Nashville! It was a very informal writing/recording job, but I had an absolute blast working with another creatively like-minded musician here in music city. Here are 5 things I learned on the job: 

7 Ways to Make Your Music Gear Invisible

We own music equipment to serve a means, not to be an end in itself. Here are 7 ways to make your performances more about your music and less about fiddling with your equipment:

 • Practice pressing buttons. The quicker you are at getting the sound you want, the less you have to worry about twisting knobs during the performance.

• Pre-prep everything.  Don't wait to the last second to put together your equipment – test everything at home, so it's not a distraction at the venue.

• Buy intiutive equipment . If your live rig is difficult to work with, get rid of it. Speed is everything when you're making on the fly tweaks.

 • Buy quality equipment. Settling for cheap may be easier in the short term, but paying a few extra dollars for something that won't constantly need fixing saves time and a lot of headaches.

• Don't switch equipment too often. It's tempting to always buy the latest and greatest, but having equipment on stage that you're comfortable with is often more important than having all the latest bells and whistles.

 • Practice using your equipment at home. Don't just program at home – set up your equipment just like you'll be using it at the venue, and practice with it frequently. 

• Simplify, simplify. The fewer cables, software instruments, and keyboards you have on stage, the less likely you are to have a problem with one of them.

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Nashville Prep Diary: Better Gear, Better Practicing

Nashville Prep Diary: Better Gear, Better Practicing

In my first Nashville blog, I laid out a couple of areas I wanted to work on: spiritual growth, my musicality, my appearance, and my equipment. This week I’ll explain a little of what I’m doing in 2 of those 4 areas- musicality and equipment. 

5 Things Musicians Should Stop Complaining About

5 Things Musicians Should Stop Complaining About

1. Stop complaining that you don’t get paid enough. We live in a free market, and people will pay what they think something is worth, not how much you think it’s worth. If you’re not getting the price you want, reposition yourself in the market and offer buyers something they don’t mind paying a fair wage for. 

Obsessive, Controlled Persistence: A Musician's Best Friend

Obsessive, Controlled Persistence: A Musician's Best Friend

this last week, I landed my first gig with the largest booking agency in St. Louis, Contemporary Productions. Contemporary books many of the largest venues in St. Louis, including Busch Stadium, most of the casinos and hotels around town, and all the major corporations. When I got the call, I was so excited.

Amazing at all the Easy Stuff

Amazing at all the Easy Stuff

Nobody wants to hire the person that’s pretty good at what they do for the really important projects, the really big shows. It’s fine to be average on small stuff where there’s not a lot at stake, but when it really counts and there’s serious money on the line, people always go for the best.